Recent Events

2017

(Go to Archive for pervious years)
Kelly Camilleri & Kathy McKay
February 25, 2017
Viewing Learning Disabilities Psychotherapy through an Attachment Lens:
Theoretical Perspectives and Practical Strategies
Abstract
This talk aims to explore themes around working therapeutically with people who live with labels of intellectualdisability, autism and acquired brain injury. What are the psychological sequelae of being born with or acquiring a disability in terms of attachment and early relations? How might therapy need to be adapted to meet individual cognitive or sensory needs? What is the role of trauma in psychological distress and how might this manifest differently in people with these labels? How is power perceived and played out in our systems of care? The talk aims to provide a psychological understanding from a variety of perspectives, with special consideration for the use of Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy (DDP) for this group and their systems.
Within the context of a short term, goal orientated therapy  world how can we provide meaningful support which is individually
tailored?
Dr Kelly Camilleri is an independent Consultant Clinical Psychologist. She qualified 19 years ago from Birmingham University and has since worked with children and adults with learning difficulty, autism, and acquired disability. Kelly has worked in a variety of sectors including the NHS, charity and the private sector. She is particularly interested in the role of attachment and trauma for the individual and their systems. Kelly is a keen proponent on the use of DDP for this group which she feels enables a dual approach focusing both on peoples internal and external worlds. She is on the Division of Clinical Psychology Southwest Committee and is the coordinator for local Psychology Against Austerity Group.
Dr Kathy McKay is a Clinical Psychologist who has worked in Learning Disability Services in the NHS since qualifying in 1995. She has also worked in Independent Practice since 2007. Settings have included community Learning Disability teams, In-patient Units and a Secure Forensic Unit. She has also worked in a CAMHS Service in a secure childrens home, and currently provides regular input into a Local Authority Family Centre to support them in taking into account a parents learning needs in their assessment and intervention processes. Kathy has provided training on attachment and trauma in learning disabilities, and further on creating attachment friendly environments in a number of the aforementioned settings. Like Kelly, Kathy has completed training in DDP, which was a driver for this area of work.
You can download the powerpoint from the talk here.
If you have any further questions, you can contact Kelly Camilleri directly via email at kelly@camilleripsychology.com
May 20,, 2017
Sally Weintrobe
Climate Change and the New Imagination

Sally Weintrobe
is a Fellow of the British Psychoanalytic Society. Currently she is writing a book on the culture that promotes disavowal of climate change. She edited and contributed to (2012) Engaging with Climate Change, shortlisted for the International Gradiva Prize for contributions to psychoanalysis.
Some of her talks can be found at: www.sallyweintrobe.com

Abstract


Sally Weintrobe argues that current dominant culture serves neo-liberalism. The culture drives the false belief that we are entitled not to have to face a particular reality. This is that neo-liberalism has led to climate change and social instability and we are caught up in its structures. This talk aims to help open up a conversation that allows us to think together about needed changes in a way that recognises that change may be disturbing, troubling and difficult as well as enlivening.

"Since the publication of Engaging with Climate Change in 2012, I have given many talks on our collective difficulty in taking climate reality seriously. The text of some of these talks can be found under Talks and Interviews on this website.
Most of us are in denial about the seriousness of climate change. I believe our main difficulty is not so much facing the science as facing that climate change is caused by humans, which means us. We have barely begun to take this in in a feeling-ful way, as to do so would face each of us with conflict and grief, and lead us to question how responsible each of us is for the environmental and social damage we see more clearly now.
What sort of framework of understanding do we need to be able to think proportionately about human responsibility for climate change? What sort of support do we need to think about this in a feeling-ful way and not cut off from the subject?
My current work is on the role our culture plays in shaping disavowal about climate change. I call it the culture of uncare, and argue its aim is to alienate and distance us from the part of us that cares about the effects of our actions.
To address climate change we need to care more. It’s as simple as that. Only felt links with the part of us that cares will give us the inner strength and will to defend the earth and life on earth at this time when both are so under attack. But to care more, and to take responsibility for our part in things, we need to do more than exhort ourselves to care. We need to understand more about the culture of uncare, what drives it, and the effects it has on us."

Paul Zeal
Sep 16, 2017
Breath, Gender and Nature’s Dreaming

Paul Zeal is a psychoanalytic psychotherapist with the Severnside Institute for Psychotherapy, a psychoanalyst with the Site for Contemporary Psychoanalysis, a constellator, and a teacher and practitioner of Chi Gung and Tai Chi. He chaired Severnside for six years, is a founder member of the Site, and a founder member of Climate Psychology Alliance. He served on the training committee of the Exeter University MSc training in psychoanalytic psychotherapy. He has taught, supervised and practised psychoanalysis and phenomenology for more than forty years. He has an MA with distinction from Dartington College of Arts (2006).
With his wife Carol, he co-facilitates Systemic Family and Nature Constellation workshops at least once a term in south-east Dartmoor where they now live.
He has several papers and articles published in books, journals and magazines, including: ‘Tao for troubled times’ Resurgence Magazine (2010); ‘Listening with many ears’ European J. for Psychotherapy (2008); and ‘Staying close to the subject’ in Object Relations and Social Relations Karnac Books (2008). All are listed on his website. www.paulzeal.co.uk
Abstract
Nature seems to me to be an evolving dream. Modern humans have woken from that dream and tend to be destructively disconnected from the fragile ecologies of which they are nevertheless a part. What if, towards re-establishing harmonious relations, we practised referring to Earth as She, rather as the scientific ‘It’, despite the paradoxes and embarrassments that arise from that? What if we practised relating to her directly, rather than to each other about ‘it’?
Sex and Gender are two of the most contested words in language, with clarifications and confusions generated in equal measure. I will use the word sex to refer to that which has been anatomically assigned to us, and gender to refer to matters of masculinity and femininity. I will critically discuss traditional psychoanalytic libido theory, namely that all sexual arousal is masculine and that the feminine is a condition of passivity. I will revise this theory towards an understanding that the feminine is itself energetic when tuned into and awakened, and indeed can be felt to underlie all masculine libidinal manifestations.
Breathing and dreaming are ways to access these intelligible mysteries. Breathing, for the cultivation of energetic awareness; and dreaming, not simply as an activity within the envelope of sleep, but as a way of processing experience from the depths of the body in the human and wider-than-human relational worlds.
email: info 'at' limbus 'dot' org 'dot' uk
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For more informtion, contact: Farhad Dalal 0778 222 0385